Equipment Needed

Before venturing into this amazing life experience, you will need to gear up. When we look at famous photographers and high quality images, we often wonder how much should we spend on equipment to achieve professional quality work. Photography can be extremely expensive, especially if you wish to keep up with technology. But, I have great news for you! There is no need to be rich to become a professional photographer. The most important thing you will need is a camera, of course. I would suggest a DSLR or a pocket camera that allows you to manually change aperture, shutter speed and ISO.

EQUIPMENT NEEDED

Before venturing into this amazing life experience, you will need to gear up. When we look at famous photographers and high quality images, we often wonder how much should we spend on equipment to achieve professional quality work. Photography can be extremely expensive, especially if you wish to keep up with technology. But, I have great news for you! There is no need to be rich to become a professional photographer. The most important thing you will need is a camera, of course. I would suggest a DSLR or a pocket camera that allows you to manually change aperture, shutter speed and ISO.

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The second most important purchase should be a lens. Now, there is a lot to say about which lens you should buy. A lot depends on which kind of photographer you are or you want to become. When I started, I was using a Canon 7D and 2 lenses that came out of the box; a 35mm-125mm and a 50mm. These lenses were really basic and most people would say that there are definitely better lenses out there (better cameras too) and they are completely right.

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The point though is to get you started with something as professional as possible without feeling like you have spent all your money. Trust me when I say that it feels much butter when you start making money with your “not so perfect camera” and then buying the better one later on.

If you only want to buy one lens, then I highly recommend starting out with any zoom lens. My favorite is the 24-70mm Canon EF-S f/2.8. It is great to start, sharp, and gives you a perfect balance between wide angle and telescope for portraits.

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I shot both these images with the sam lens: 24-70 mm Canon. As you can see there is a lot of range using only one lens. Having a zoom lens with you will help you try out different frame sizes so you can better grasp what it means to switch between a wide and a telescope lens (and why). If you don’t have a camera yet and you want to try out different lenses, you can book a one on one session with Andrea Urbinati, one of our photographers. He will let you test out his camera and tell you everything you need to know before making the big purchase!
Hope to see you at the next class

If you have any further questions please contact us at: info@soamcreative.com

Why do the same lenses have different costs?

Lenses are extremely complex pieces of equipment and that is the main reason for their high price. But why is this happening?

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EF 50mm f/1.8 STM $89.99

EF 50mm f/1.8 STM $89.99


EF 50mm f/1.0 L USM $4,039.90

These two lenses are both 50mm lenses for Canon an there is a $3,949.91 difference between them. That is a big difference if you think that they almost weight the same. We could talk a lot in details about why this is happening, but for now I will tell you one of the most important reasons; the aperture. In a later class we will talk a lot about aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. During this class we will explain exactly why a f/1.0 is much more powerful than a f/1.8. So, which one should you buy? I would suggest buying a f/1.8 to start. Spend less than $100 on a lens and learn how that works before spending $4,000 on a lens you might not even use after a week.

You’re probably now asking, but won’t I take better images if I buy the more expensive one?If you don’t know what aperture, shutter speed, and ISO means; then the answer is no, you will not take better images.

 

Here you will find a few more reasons and explanations for why lenses can be quite expensive:


A Short Lens Glossary

• Lens Elements: All the main lenses and optical elements inside the lenses.
Usually some of these move,, either to change their lens’ focal distance, or just
for focusing. The aperture blades also fit here.
• Optical Design: Some lenses have the great ability not to change their size
when moving from one focal length to another. A great example of weird optical
design is this lens, which expands like a telescope in a very odd way.
• Construction: Fitting everything into a great looking, smart, ergonomic and handy
device is really an engineering masterwork that carries a price.
• Motors: Autofocus systems are driven by precise motors that over time are
getting more powerful in terms of speed and silence; this is one of the main
reasons behind price shifts.
• Image Stabilization: If you have a lens that goes further than 50mm, whether it is
a prime lens or a zoom, you’ll want to have image stabilization, because
everything after the 50mm starting point will tend to shake with your hands,
and the shake will grow the longer the focal length.It’s like trying to keep a
broomstick steady by hand – holding it one end versus keeping a pencil straight
(even if it was an extremely light broom!).Any guesses about the result? Give it a
try.
• Coating: Taming light is hard, and optical engineers’ more innovative ideas can
be traced back to the lens coatings, which are applied to render the truest
colors in your pictures, without hazes or casts.
• Weather Sealing: Expensive lenses come with special seals that keep moisture
and dust where it belongs – outside your gear.
• Glass: Last but definitely not least, the biggest reason for that fat price tag on
some lenses, is the glass. High-quality glass comes at big prices, period. See
this as a jewel, with a utilitarian purpose.

 

Point and Shoot camera or DSLR?

 I’m not here to argue and I will tell you what I personally think; DSLR cameras are better than point and shoot cameras for different reasons.

1) Better optics
2) Better technology
3) Much better quality
4) Larger sensor
5) Able to control every aspect of the camera
6) Ability to use different lenses

The biggest factor is the sensor. The size of a SLR sensor is several orders of magnitude larger than a camcorder or point and shoot. The larger the size of the sensor reduces the number of sensors off a large chip (the “yield”). This pushes up the cost of the sensor dramatically.

 Next add in specialized systems not found on point and shoots such as, mechanical shutter systems, mechanical auto focusing systems, mirror systems, and matrix metering systems. You also have a signal processing chip system to handle tens of megabytes of data per second, converting it from RAW to JPEG, and writing the data instantly. By comparison, a camcorder has to work with a lot less data because the resolution is much lower.

 So, in addition to the one component, the sensor, you’ve also got to factor in all the supporting elements.

Tripods

The most common questions about tripods are:

1) Should I buy a tripod?
2) Which tripod should I buy?
3) What’s the difference between a cheap and expensive tripod?

 

To answer these questions:

Should you? I have 5 tripods and 3 monopods but I only use 1 of the tripods, once a month if I’m lucky. On the other hand, my friend Ryan uses his cheap tripod everyday. It really depends on what you do or what you want to do. We will talk more later about which kind of photographers are out there and which kind of equipment they need.
There are several different types of tripods, each dependent upon the application for which they will be used. The nomenclature may vary, but generally speaking, the various types include; pocket tripods, tabletop tripods, travel tripods, full size or medium duty tripods, and studio tripods. Although each type specializes in a given application, there can be some crossover from one type to another.

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GPX TPD427S Tripod $ 9.56

GPX TPD427S Tripod $ 9.56


Cartoni O105 Omega Professional Tripod System $ 13,895.20

The difference between a cheap and expensive tripod can be about $14,000. If you think a better tripod would give you a better image, you are right. But again, if you don’t know what aperture, shutter speed, and ISO means then all that money will not help your picture. Between the two, I would pick the $10 without a doubt. It is much easier to transport and faster to operate.

 

Recap

 Before spending all your money on some ridiculously expensive gear, please continue with this guide. You will learn that becoming a professional photographer also means understanding about money and necessity,

Aperture shutter speed and ISO are the fundamentals if you wish to get your perfect photography gear! So, are you ready to get started?